100 Days Of Rejection Challenge?

Zoey 101 rejected - TV Fanatic

The 100 Days Rejection Challenge is a challenge in which you basically seek out rejection for 100 days! And this means REJECTION! You have to sought out situations which could likely result in  rejection such as asking a stranger for £100 or asking for a free room at a hotel.

The creator of this challenge is Jia Jiang, who gave a TedTalk about it. His goal was to desensitise himself from the pain of rejection and overcome fear.

 

At first, it sounded very silly and kind of scary to me but upon further thought, I actually think it’s brilliant. So many people fear rejection, to the point where they won’t put themselves in any situations that could potentially result in rejection like telling someone you like them or going for a job opportunity.

I, personally, don’t really fear rejection, but nonetheless, this challenge will 100% build confidence and install a warrior within you because 100 days of rejection makes a person resilient and fearless.

 

Of course, 100 days is a lot and starting from avoiding rejection to going 100 days with rejection is a big leap so even if you can’t manage the full 100 days, don’t be afraid to face rejection in you day to day life. You have nothing to lose. You only have one life and you’ll have regrets if you don’t take opportunities or take control of your own life. Take rejection one step at a time.

 

Take this post as a sign to apply for that job or ask someone out or do whatever it is you’re fearing because of rejection. Just give it a go, for me. 🥺

 

“Sometimes rejection in life is redirection.”

-Shay

Death Celebrations!

Death is a strange topic because it sounds scary but it’s inevitable and universal. The thing every single one of us have in common is death (and the fact we’re alive, duh!). But we’re all going to experience death one day, unless somehow science manages to make us immortal. But is immortality even a blessing?

 

Death is something people fear, leading to existential crises and worrying about every move but really, death is kind of a blessing. Without death, what would we even be doing? Life wouldn’t be exciting and adventurous. We wouldn’t have bucket lists, which encourage us to live our lives to the fullest.

 

Because of this fear we have of death, it has become this taboo topic, we avoid speaking about. But we have to speak about it more. Especially with children. Most people seriously underestimate children and how much information and big topics they can process but it’s the prime time to bring them to familiarisation with these big topics whether that be mental health, climate change, racism and sexism and of course, death. They can handle a lot more than you think.

Discussing death with children can make it seem less scary, supporting them. It can be a scary and confusing thing and it enables children to ask questions. Kids are curious by nature and allowing them to better understand topics like this means they can explore it and question it in their own way instead of being confronted with it head on when someone dies later on in their life.

When I was younger, I went to a lot of funerals; being in a big family, there were a lot of deaths. At first, I didn’t really understand death, seeing people cry and the dismal vibe in the air was a bit overwhelming. I wasn’t close to any of the people that died but it’s still quite a bit to process for a child. The first death, close to me, was my cat, and still is my cat. That was one of the worst feelings in my life; it was confusing, shocking, overwhelming, heartbreaking, devastating and left me bewildered, lost and confused. I didn’t know how to express my feelings and I wasn’t encouraged to talk about it and felt ashamed to cry and show any extreme emotions so it all bottled up. I was never spoken to about it. It took me god knows how long to get over it. I can only wish, now, that my parents had talked to me about it and in the future, I will make sure to talk to my own kids about it (death, not my cat).

Talking about death will give you peace of mind.

 

As I said, the funerals I went to were very dismal, icy and melancholic. However, death is celebrated very differently by many cultures, different to the Christian and Catholic-like rituals most Western society and cultures have. Here are some of the different celebrations:

 

Mexico

Everyone has heard day of the dead, also known as Día de Los Muertos, which is celebratedCelebrating Dia de los Muertos at Dominican | November 1st and 2nd. Families are reminded of their dead loved ones, keeping their memories alive and visiting their graves to clean and deliver gifts like flowers. The festival is celebrated in a blast of colour and parades, singing and dancing. It’s truly beautiful and an amazing way to celebrate the dead.

 

Brazil

A few other places in Latin America celebrate Día de Los Muertos but in a calmer way, such as in Brazil, families come together and bring gifts to cemeteries. They also attend mass and eat Churrasco together, which is Brazilian barbeque.

 

Sweden

In Sweden, when someone dies, the body is kept somewhere special for one to three weeks before being buried or cremated. Swedish flowers are laid on the coffin and songs are sung.

 

Poland

The Polish open doors and windows of the house of the person who died so the soul can pass to the spiritual world from their house. Mirrors are also covered and clocks are stopped.

 

Ireland 

Like in Poland, the Irish open windows for two hours so the soul of the deceased can pass out to leave. Blocking the open windows is believed to bring bad luck. After two hours, the windows are shut to prevent the soul from coming back.

 

Muslim Rituals

One of my manager’s cousins died recently, in which he had to travel for the Muslim rituals of death, which is when I first came to learn about it. The Islamic law (sharia) appeals for the rituals Funeral-Islam - Islam rites of passageand burial to happen as soon as possible, usually within 24 hours. The funeral happens at a mosque after washing the body and covering it whilst the body’s hands are placed in prayer. The body as well as the funeral attendees face mecca while being led by the holy leader (Imam) in prayer. The coffin is buried facing mecca followed by prayer (salah). The burial is usually only attended by men and three handfuls of dirt are thrown in by each person. The next several days are followed by other death rituals such as on the seventh day, people visit the grave and bring food to the poor. On the fortieth day, mourners start to wear regular clothes instead of black. In comparison to other mourning rituals and death celebrations, it lasts a lot longer.

 

China

Like Día de Los Muertos, the Chinese have Qingming. It’s Tomb Sweeping Day and the graves of their loved ones are taken care of by cleaning it, cutting weeds, etc. Gifts and offerings are alsoHolidays: Tomb-Sweeping Day also known as Qing Ming takes place in early April, people sweep tombs, and give food a… | Festivals in china, Chinese festival, Holiday brought such as paper, symbolising money. Kites with lanterns are also flown to represent good fortune. This is their way of paying respect to the dead.

 

South Korea

Koreans have Chuseok, a festival in which families wake up early and prepare their tables with food (food is an important part of this celebration as they believe their ancestors harvest the crops of fruits and grains during this time). They bow twice at the table and proceed to eat. They also visit their ancestors’ tombs. People view this celebration as the South Korean Thanksgiving.

 

Japan

The Japanese celebrate the Obon festival, celebrated for three days (13th to 15th of the 7th month on the lunar calendar). Lanterns are placed around the city, rivers and lakes to guide their ancestors, they believe have returned during this period, back to their origins. The graves of families’ loved ones are also visited to be cleaned and to pray at.

Pin by Morikami Museum on Spy Vibe Novel | Japan, World photography, Japanese festival

Egypt

In ancient Egypt, when someone died, there was a lot of worshipping towards the different gods they believed in. They would parade around town with mud on their faces. Organs would be removed and kept in jars from the body, except for the heart. The priest would wash the body and put oil as well as water from the Nile river on it before mummification. The body was then mummified, proceeded by people following the priest while he prayed over the body. I couldn’t find a lot of information on current Egyptian traditions when it comes to death, it was mainly about ancient Egyptian rituals so if anyone knows a bit about current traditions, I would love to know.

 

Hawaii

There is a thousand year old sacred tradition called the Clean Burial where after the body is partially cremated, the bones are salvaged and buried. The bones are placed in a a Hawaiian-made cloth in a burial container. However, I think this tradition has stopped because of health concerns. Nowadays, the funerals are a combination of ancient tradition and modern traditions of the West. In the eulogy, funny stories are shared and laughter is encouraged to show affection.

 

Nigeria

Nigerian funerals contain a lot of singing, dancing, music. In fact, they believe the more of this, the better chance of a successful afterlife the deceased person has. There is prayer, poetry and eulogies. Sometimes there are animal sacrifices such as goats to eat. Burial preparations can last a long time but this depends on the religious beliefs of the family. As I said before, Muslims bury the body facing Mecca but sometimes Nigerians bury depending on gender: men are buried facing east to see the sunrise and women are buried facing the west to see the sunset and so she can prepare dinner for her husband in the afterlife. The body is covered in black earth (red earth is believed to cause blemishes in the afterlife). Special and significant items may be buried with the individual to help them in the afterlife.

 

Ghana

Ghanaians announce the death of a loved one with a letter or email. The main celebration occurs Saturday morning after the burial. There are many different tribes in Ghana who haveWelcome to Ghana, where the funerals are gigantic parties – The Denver Post different death rituals and religious beliefs from the Ashanti tribe to the Mole-Dagbon. In the Ashanti tribe, the family will prepare the body. The festivities include respecting the body as it goes to the ancestral world (Okra). Hundreds of people may attend the festivities; it isn’t just intimate. The Ashanti chief sits under colourful umbrellas, observing. The family members wear red or black. It is common for Ghanaians to sing gospel hymns and other religious songs. Fantasy caskets are commonly used too where casket makers will shape it to look like something the deceased loved such as a plane or bird or sea-creature, etc. A week after the loved one has died, the family will gather to remember them and their life.

 

South Africa

The window of the house that death occurred in may be covered in ash and all beds are removed. Sometimes there is an animal sacrifice to please ancestors. After the funeral and burial, attendees wash off any dirt before entering their houses to get rid of bad luck. Sometimes there is a wake known as the After Tears party entailing drinking and joking, comforting relatives and remembering the deceased.

 

Tibet

Another death ritual I found extremely interesting was the Tibetan Sky Burial. It is a funeral tradition where the corpse of the deceased is put on a mountaintop near a hoard of vultures where they eat at the dead and take it up into the sky. This is a way of giving back to the elements.

Sky Burial Custom in Tibet

Every family is different, no matter what country you are from so rituals differ from family to family but these are some of the traditions that these countries hold. Some bits of information may not be accurate; I’m not an expert on the different traditions in each culture, this is what I have learnt from research. Please do correct me, if there are any mistakes.

Death isn’t necessarily a bad thing, or a curse. Of course, it is a sad, devastating thing but there’s no point stressing or dreading it as it will happen to all of us and we can’t change that. Instead, we should embrace our lives and celebrate the lives and accomplishments of our loved ones, too. Discuss and talk about it and normalise it, not just within our society but within yourself.

 

I would love to know your opinion on death and any cultural rituals you know of.

 

-Shay

Rants of Retail!

I have a part time job in a clothes shop, where my role changes throughout the day. This means I get to experience different aspects and areas of working in retail and although I am extremely grateful for having a job, especially since it’s not a hard job, there are still downfalls.

So today, I’m going to be ranting about those downfalls. 😀

 

The Customer Isn’t Always Right

Customer service is a huge part of working in retail and I’m generally a nice person, so I am nice to the customers and try to help as much as possible. But good lord, give me strength, sometimes there are people that I honestly think and choose to think have come from living in a cave, having been raised by wolves. It’s like they have no respect or care for other people. I completely understand you can be in a bad mood but it’s still wrong to be mean to someone, especially a worker trying to help you out.

I’ve gotten subtle racism, rude remarks about how I’m doing things wrong when I’m really not, ageism, harassment from older men, etc.  It can really mess up your day when you experience it.

 

The 5p Bane of the Universe Bag

In the UK, the charge for a plastic carrier bag is 5p. This is because it promotes and encourages people to not buy plastic bags and re-use their own or get a bag for life. It means that there will be less plastic bags littered on the streets and less plastic will be manufactured and broken down, adding to global warming. And I mean, it’s only 5p. You can find that on the walk to the shop.

However, if I got 5p for the amount of times I’ve been asked why they need to pay for it or have to stand behind the till, listening to customers complain about the charge, I wouldn’t even need a job. It gets old.

If you don’t want to get rid of your change, re-use a plastic bag or use the magic and power of your hands.

And then I have those cases where people will buy the tiniest thing like a keyring and ask for a bag. Seriously? XD Defeats the whole purpose of save the environment.

 

The Jokes

Sometimes, there isn’t a price tag on the clothes that someone is buying. This means I have to type in a code and usually, before I type it in, I tell them there’s no price tag so they know why I’m going to be tapping away at the keyboard. And sometimes, there are people who like to make overused jokes. I love conversing with customers but just skip the annoying jokes like the ever so funny, “Oh so I guess it’s free then haha.” This also happens when the barcode isn’t working.

I didn’t know I was serving Kevin Hart.

 

Waste of Timers

I often get customers come up to the till with a pile of clothes and I’ll start scanning them. Then they’ll ask what size the item they got is and say “oh…that might be too big.” And then they’ll decide they don’t want it. And that’s fine, you can change your mind but don’t. do. it. for. every. single. item.

And sometimes items are misplaced in the wrong sections. Some stands have signs on it saying £8. It actually says from £8, which means £8 and up. But nobody ever reads the ‘from’ bit so they’ll come up, thinking what they’ve got is whatever it said on the sign and not on the actual price tag and then get irritated at me when it’s a price higher.

Along the lines of wrong prices, sometimes people come up to the till, get me to scan and de-tag and bag everything and then realise the price is a whole £2 above what they thought the price was and yell at me. XD

READ THE PRICE TAG OR ASK FIRST!!!

 

Also, don’t come and tell me that a certain item you have your eye on is cheaper in another shop. If it’s cheaper in another shop, go there then.

 

Are You Gonna Pick That Up?

But seriously, are you?

The amount of times I’ve tidied something up and someone goes over to that particular stand and dropped a few things, turned the hangers around, managed to turn the clothes inside out and have the audacity to look me in the eye and do nothing is beyond me. Or let their kids run around knocking things to the floor.

I get that it’s my job and I have to clean it up but it’s not hard to just hang the one thing your just dropped. It’s like littering and saying it’s the street cleaner’s job to pick it up.

 

The Cherry On Top

Get ready for this because these are true stories. I have never been there on the days these have happened but I get told about it very quickly.

 

One piece of advice for you when clothes shopping is don’t get to comfy in the changing rooms.

People have pooped in there. For real.

 

This one man kept asking for the toilet and asked what he was gonna do since there isn’t a toilet. So he went in the changing room and I don’t think I need to explain anymore.

This other boy was trying on these suits. He was in the changing room for ages and my manager asked his brother why he was taking so long. Eventually, the boy came out, with poop in the suit trousers. He pooped in the suit trousers!!! I actually did come that day but not to work, just to shop.

There have been other cases and some with urine too. You’ve got to mix it up every now an again, of course.

 

Despite all these downfalls, I love my job and the people I work with and even the customers, because most of them are nice. I am very grateful for having it and the downfalls can be annoying but to be honest, they don’t actually bother me a lot. There are definitely more pros to cons but I thought the cons would be funny to rant about. I may post a pros post later on.

 

Do any of you have a job or have experienced the same things I have?

 

-Shay

Outrage Culture!

Today, I want to talk about something that’s important but everybody disregards. And that is, the fact that schools force children to learn different languages, different from their own, which in my opinion, is a clear form of cultural appropriation. Conditioning these young people, the future generation, to normalise and glamourize speaking a language that belongs to another country and culture is wrong!

OUTRAGE CULTURE!

 

What is Outrage Culture?

Outrage culture, also known as outrage porn (don’t ask), according to the great and brutally honest Urban Dictionary is:

“When people play the victim card and bend over backwards to be as offended as possible when they really aren’t. Using hissy fits, political correctness, character assassination, and a false sense of moral authority, the outrager hopes to gain power and public recognition for their brave act of justice as well as a sense of control over their meaningless existence. Often accompanied by demands for financial compensation for their “pain and suffering.”

 

With the positive that is the progression of society and social justice, a negative must follow. I think that negative is outrage culture… and arrogant, brave conservatives.

I’ve seen a lot of people use topics like feminism to the extreme in a way that is just ridiculous, for example, getting outraged at the fact a girl on a TV show wore the colour pink. What’s wrong with the colour pink, you ask? Well, it’s obviously stereotypical of women to wear pink and by wearing pink, that character is conforming to the stereotypes and enforcing other women to follow it, DUH. It makes serious topics like feminism seem stupid and something a group of overly sensitive people are a part of, when it isn’t.

 

One in particular case I want to talk about is the ex Cbeebies presenter, Cerrie Burnell. She was born with part of her arm missing. Parents complained about her due to the reasons that  it could “possible cause sleep problems” and “scar toddlers”. They also complained because it forced parents to raise a discussion about disabilities with children before they were ready, apparently. Let me repeat: parents complained. They went out of their way to complain and discriminate a woman, who has a disability, which she can’t change. Because. They. Were. Outraged!!!

I don’t understand why people go out of their way to outrage against harmless things. A disabled presenter on a kids show exposes children to the real world because there are other people in the world with disabilities. And other children, with missing parts of their arms, might feel represented and more comfortable and normal.

 

With all this outrage culture, content creators and social media influencers need to be extremely careful about what they say and put out online, in fear or offending and upsetting. I’ve heard people say that it’s the liberals getting too offended but it’s actually illiberal liberalism. It’s hate and negativity. Okay, it is important to educate and voice your own opinions but there’s no need to get overly offended and patronise and belittle people.

 

However, I was having a conversation with a boy, who is pretty homophobic (that context is important). We were talking in a group about outrage culture. At the end of the conversation, the boy said that there are so many people trying to promote more diversity and representation of the LGBTQ+ community in the media and that it’s silly how people are so passionate about it since in real life, there aren’t that many people in the LGBTQ+ community anyway. I was a bit shook.

You best believe I put him in his place. This “outrage culture” is valid because it will allow society to move forward, positively, and it’s true that more representation of the LGBTQ+ community is needed. It’s important to note that this boy is slightly homophobic, of which he has admitted himself, and hence, would surround himself with similar people or at least, surround himself with no one involved in the LGBTQ+ community, so is probably why he thinks there’s not a lot of non-straight people.

 

Outrage culture can be, at times, quite debatable, for example, the whole fiasco with Moana and how Dapper Laughs, a comedian, whose UKtour was cancelled due to the rape jokes he made.

I personally think we all just need to chill. It’s important to raise awareness, promote positivity and diversity and point out when people are wrong and educate them but at the same time, everyone should be chill while doing it. I guess there are certain valid exceptions but at this point, it’s almost as if we’re not even allowed to talk anymore without offending anyone.

What’s your opinion of this dark side of social justice?

 

-Shay

Does Anything Really Exist?

You’re reading this post right now, whether that be through the ability of your eyes or ears or any sensory cell in your body. You’re reading this, right at this very moment. Right?

Now, you might be thinking, Shay, what’s up with you? It’s not even 4:20.

Well, young child (or old), be prepared to start thinking as if it is 4:20.

In our day to day lives, we touch, hear, smell, see, think, talk, move, etc. That’s how we know we exist. We acknowledge the world functioning around us and the people we meet and the places we go and we input all that information in through our sensory cells, which basically explain to your brain what’s going on in the outside world, while it’s cooped up inside your skull. It’s as if your brain is living vicariously through you…but also, functioning and supplying you with the necessities to live.

And we trust our brains to process what is going on because it’s all we really know, since the day we were born. Now, take away that trust.

How do we know what our brain is processing and telling us is actually happening?

How do you know we’re not just hooked up to a machine and 4D videos aren’t being inputted into our brains to make it seem like we’re living in this fake world, where we can feel things and see things? How do you know your thoughts are even yours?

 

How do you know if we’re not just in a some kind of dream? Or a simulation?

Is seeing really believing?

Rubber Arm Experiment

Take the Rubber Arm Experiment, as an example. People were convinced that the rubber arm in front of them was really their arm, with just a few minutes of illusion.

An experiment by Shaw and Porter of the University of British Columbia in Canada found that when they had three interviews with a group of participants, telling and asking them of one false memory (either a crime they did or an emotional event like injury) as well as telling them about two true memories, that were personal to the participants, 71% of those 30 student participants developed a false memory of the crime and 76.6% of another 30 students formed a false memory of the emotional event.

These students were convinced, in quick time, of inaccurate and false criminal and emotional events that occurred in their lives, which never even happened.

So how do we really know that what’s happened in our lives is real? It could all just be one big lie!

 

Maybe you’re real…but how do you know that everybody else is? You can’t see what they’re really thinking or their functioning brain.

 

Morty Lefkoe wrote a post similar to this and asked readers to imagine their hand expanding and expanding until there was nothing in the universe except the hand. He stated:

it would disappear because there would be nothing in the universe that was not the hand. This is a very basic concept about reality: In order for any thing to exist, there must also be not that thing. In order for anything to exist, it must be distinguished from everything else. If no distinction is made between a specific thing and everything else, there is only an undifferentiated everything—which is another way of saying nothing. Everything, without any distinctions, is the same as nothing.”

 

If I lost you there, I’m not surprised. I was a bit lost too. But to basically put it in simple terms, imagine the air. We sometimes refer to the air as nothing because there’s “nothing” there, when actually, there are millions and millions of particles and elements milling around. And they’re not just the same element – they’re different. But we can’t see that difference, we can’t see that distinction so to us, it’s just a big collective thing known as air, which is a huge thing since air is pretty much everywhere so we consider it to be nothing. Think of the phrase “vanish into nothingness”. It’s not really nothingness, though.

Therefore, what really does the word ‘exist’ mean? That’s the real question.

Because with what Morty Lefkoe explained, if everything exists, nothing really does.

 

At the end of the day, no matter what your opinion is and whatever this crazy world really is and whether or not we are real or not, this is our reality and our only reality. So deal with it.

 

-Shay

The Island of Misfit Geniuses!

I remember when I did Media Studies at GCSEs, we had to research about game shows and how they became so popular in the UK. We studied Mastermind, a BBC television quiz, and we studied Fred Housego, who was a taxi driver. He won the game show in 1980, which brought a wave of shock to everyone, because he was just a taxi driver. This impacted people’s mind-sets on what it meant to be somebody clever and the future of game shows. People, from all walks of life, obtained more confidence and hope, after Fred Housego won Mastermind, as it proved that you didn’t have to have a degree to be intelligent.

“Everybody is a Genius. But If You Judge a Fish by Its Ability to Climb a Tree, It Will Live Its Whole Life Believing that It is Stupid.”

-Albert Einstein

 

There are different types of ‘Genius’, which is something, I’ve found, a lot of people can’t come to accept or understand.

 

Having taken primarily science-y subjects for A levels, I’ve worked with, socialised and made friends with a lot of other science based students, since we are centred around the same areas of my school, we learn similar stuff and we all have similar goals, like working in medicine or labs or with telescopes, etc. And although all of that has taught me a lot and made me even more excited about learning new things in science, there have also been a lot of little discoveries I’ve made. A lot of these science-orientated people can be quite arrogant. I’m not saying all of these people I’ve met are but there have been a good share that are.  They’re so pinned on their own ideas, for example, the big bang theory is the only way that the universe began. And that’s okay to believe that. I believe that. BUT, a lot of those people do not accept the fact that others think differently. They’ll believe that science is the only way, nothing else is true. I guess you can dismiss that point, considering some people are just strong about what they believe is true. Sure. However, I’ve also found that these science-y students think they’re entitled. Of course, if you’ve put in the hard work, you’ve studied, you’ve done your research, you’ve done every titration experiment and every calculation with great accuracy and care, you can have bragging rights and you can show off because you do deserve it. And obviously, you’ll know more about a subject you’re specialised in than someone who isn’t specialised in that topic. But that doesn’t mean you’re better than everyone else, just because you know the position of equilibrium or how to work out standard deviation.

I’m just basing this idea of people feeling entitled on science-based students, because that’s who I’m most surrounded by but I know this applies to other people as well like musical geniuses, etc.

 

I think the education system and the way society works, in general, is to blame for this, but I’ve noticed a lot of people comparing their intelligence by asking “okay, so then what grade did you get in maths?” to see who’s smarter. Grades are another thing that do not define intelligence. Academic intelligence is measure with grades. Being academically intelligent or not does not define whether you’re a genius or not. There’s actually a 0.2 correlation between IQ (intelligence best measure) and grades.

 

With all this rambling and venting, I’m trying to explain that not everyone needs to be a scientist or a straight A student or watch plays all the time to be somebody intelligent. I feel like nowadays, there’s a stigma around people, who choose to lead a more ‘chill’ creative path or work in other jobs like retail and services, assuming they’re not as clever, as their intelligence is not defined in society. It’s almost as if all these other smart people, from all walks of life, other than people involved in STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) related careers and choices, are chucked onto this island of misfit geniuses because their ‘genius’ doesn’t fit in with what people think being a genius is. And that’s a shame because I’ve met a lot of people that are incredibly intelligent but don’t think so because they work in clothes stores and didn’t get good grades in school and society claims that means you’re stupid, which I think is a stupid claim.

 

I want anyone reading this to understand that you do not need to be a Darwin or Newton to be a genius. Referring back to Einstein’s quote, you just have to find and work at the thing you enjoy. Not everyone can be good at everything and not everyone is good at the same thing. If that was true, society and the world just wouldn’t work. Despite the people that hate differences, we do need difference. 

You can be and do whatever you want to be and still be a smart individual so long as you work hard and maintain a positive attitude that you’ll succeed.

 

-Shay

What Are You Doing Tomorrow?

I’m not here to engage in small talk about your plans for tomorrow. Not the plans you’re probably thinking about anyways – the kind where you describe where you’re going or what you’re going to eat for lunch.

I’m talking about the plans on what you choose to do with the time you have that’ll affect you and your life.

 

I was listening to this short clip (my friend posted it on his Snapchat story) and it was about dwelling on the past. I forgot who was in the video and I can’t find the video but he said something along the lines of: how many Instagram quotes, posts, people, content, etc, will it take to make you stop dwelling on the past. And it’s true.

Everyone can relate to this because there’s always some aspect of our pasts that we constantly think about or regret or replay in our minds. But the hard, brutal truth is: it’s never going to change. Whatever happened cannot change. It’s in the past – that’s the point.

Everyone trips and falls, and some harder than other. But that’s okay.

It may seem like the end of the world because you are the centre of your world. Any minor inconvenience that happens to you can seem major because you are the core of your life, as obvious as it sounds. We’re self centred because we only know the perspectives of ourselves; we can only see through our own eyes and move with our own legs.

 

But you can focus on the future and you can change tomorrow. Every single human on earth has the same amount of time in the day. Even if that time you have is mainly spent in the bright light of the sun or whether it’s spent in the dark blanket of sky and moon, we all have approximately twenty four hours. And it’s your choice on how you use that time and what you decide to do and be, the moment you wake up.

 

Make a change day by day. Little by little. And don’t dwell on the past.

 

So, what are you doing tomorrow?

-Shay

Who Came Up With The Idea…?

I went out the other day with my dad and sister and we went to this really cute waffle place for lunch. My dad had ordered a breakfast waffle, despite the time of day, and I sat in my seat, daydreaming off into space, as I do, and once I had been brought back to reality, I found myself staring at an egg. Just an egg frying.

And I wondered. Who decided it would be a good idea to get this white oval thing, that came out of a chicken’s butt, crack it and eat it?

So I did my research and realised that back in the day, humans used to hunt for their food and tasted everything that didn’t smell disgusting or dangerous. And the discovery that eggs were edible probably emerged very early on in the timeline of human existence. As well as this, other mammals ate eggs too (and of course, still do).

BUT!

It got me thinking about the other origin of ideas that seem very strange or very smart and so I’m going to compile a list of them without doing any research on it (for now):

 

Initially Strange Ideas:

  • The initial idea to pull crackers on Christmas (I know there’s usually a little note with info on it but I honestly forgot what it says.)
  • The decision to keep and look after animals in your own house
  • First suggestion to make a wish on a shooting star
  • First person to burn leaves and smoke it
  • The decision to use fungus to make alcoholic drinks from grains and fruits
  • The beginning of the myth the moon is made of cheese
  • The decision to use paper as an exchange for items and products
  • The idea that ribbed flared trousers look good XD
  • The realisation of death (I know this sounds stupid but I mean like realising they’re not asleep, etc. Makes sense in my head.)
  • The concept that ties make you look sophisticated
  • The initial idea that an extremely skinny waist is attractive and desired
  • Crocs
  • The idea that dark colours are ‘depressing’
  • The idea that white symbolizes ‘purity’ and ‘innocence’
  • The idea of phones and communication via satellites (I feel like I’ve already learnt this at school…)
  • Idea of slime
  • The idea that black skin and darker skins, generally, were inferior to light skin even though continents like Africa had more resources
  • The idea women were inferior to men even though women literally shoot out other humans
  • Beginning of modern oral languages
  • The first ever religion
  • First idea to shave hair off our bodies
  • My sister says: Idea of the shape of a love heart (I actually know this one but thought it might be something other people might question)
  • Who came up with the actual concept of time
  • The initial idea of memes and the first ever meme
  • First person to decide/create ‘bad/forbidden words’
  • The initial idea of the tooth fairy

Feel free to answer any of them, even if some of them are obvious and just me being stupid. XD

Also, comment your own initially strange ideas like the eating eggs one and I could make a part two.

 

-Shay

Bad and Good Luck!

It’s Friday the 13th and you know what that means!

Bad luck!

 

But what is bad luck? And in association with that, what’s good luck? What’s luck at all?

We’re constantly saying “good luck” or saying people are “unlucky” or “lucky”.

My mum, I think, is a very firm believer in luck. I came home once, telling her a story about my friend, whose bag got pooped on by a seagull, three days in a row. She told me that my friend should have bought a lottery ticket because apparently getting freaking pooed on brings good luck. I’m not as superstitious as her but even I have to admit, I can be just a little stitious. I have always thought of my sister as a “lucky” person and that’s why she always wins on scratch cards (even if it’s not a lot) and just generally gets her way like winning every time we toss a coin. They’re small examples but always have me wondering…whether there’s some juju going on or whether my sister’s a witch? Or just “lucky”?

 

Or is everything just a big coincidence?

It’s hard to agree that a sequence of occurrences that seem influenced by luck is just a pure coincidence but actually, maths begs differ, which I’ll elaborate on in a post in the near future.

 

Since it’s Friday the 13th, a lot of people believe something bad will happen to them. The history of the superstition that something bad will happen to you, on this hectic day, stems from Christianity. But as well as that, I think that idea has been maintained because: a) some people are very superstitious and b) if you think something bad is going to happen to you, that’s all you’ll be thinking about and so if something happens to go slightly wrong, coincidentally, it must seem like “bad luck” because your mind has been expecting it.

 

There are crazy and fun extents people will go to, across the world and different cultures, just to maintain and gain this good luck. Examples include smashing dishes on New Years Eve and also, eating a dozen grapes until the ring of the New Year (I actually did this, for fun, just before the strike of twelve for 2018)! I even found out right where I live, the UK, some people say “rabbit!” just as they wake up on the first day of the month.

I think the term “bad and good luck” is just a way for us to make an excuse about whatever the circumstance, making us feel less responsible and better about the situation. And that’s probably a good coping mechanism. 🙂

 

Do you believe in good and bad luck?

 

-Shay